View Ranges and Revizto, What’s The Big Deal?

NewsOctober 01, 2020

October 5, 2020
Lewis Guy, Captain Awesome and Implementation Service Manager

Never Overlook the Fundamentals

From 2007 until 2017, I spent pretty much every day of my working life inside a Revit model. I loved it, and I knew my way around even the dirtiest, darkest corners of it. But often, it is not these dark corners that catch you out. Often, it is the basics that are overlooked and cause far more significant problems than one could imagine. 

Apart from the fact that the title of this blog clearly suggests what I am going to be talking about I could easily be referring to Shared Coordinates. But I am not. I am talking about “View Ranges”. Now, honestly, when was the last time that you thought about the view range in your project? How many of you have the view range set in your template? How many of you even bother to review this on your project? Don’t worry; you are not the only one. I certainly fell foul to this far too often. But I never really considered the knock-on effect that my view range could have on my drawings. Nor did I consider how this would affect my Revizto project either. 

View Ranges in Revit

Within Revit, setting up a view range is easy and usually already set up in your project template. Your Company or Team CAD/BIM Manager knows what they are doing and as such the template they have spent weeks developing and updating with each yearly release of the software is going to be correct. So I don’t need to actually do anything, right? 

Let’s say that is the case and you use the view ranges determined by the template. What does this actually mean?

Typically, the Top and Bottom range and the Cut Plane will be set the same for every level of your building. Below is an example of this. “It looks fine”, “It’s what we always use” I hear you say. But is it fine?

 

The image above shows you the view range in a section so you can see what area of the building vertically is picked up by the plan view. The Top is +2300mm, the Bottom is -1200mm and the Cut Plane is +1500mm. Based on this information I know that my plans are going to look good. I am going to see everything that I need to see, including where the windows are because my Cut Plane is high enough to pick this up. So I am happy.

But have you ever put the view ranges together across multiple floors to see how well it really stitches together? The image below shows in section the view range duplicated across multiple floors. And straight away I can see an issue, there is a gap between the top of the view range for Level 1 and the bottom of the view range for Level 2.

In this scenario, it's only 500mm but when you consider that the cut plane is the point at which information is shown on the plan there is actually a 1300mm gap on your drawings. 1300mm where anything drawn in that space is not visible on a plan view. 1300mm where a QS using the drawings to cost the project has no idea what is there. 1300mm that effectively doesn’t exist.

You also need to remember that the view ranges are not particularly dynamic so if the storey height changes between levels the gap distance between floors could decrease but it could also increase and even more of your building will be missing.

View Ranges and Revizto, What’s The Big Deal? Never Overlook the Fundamentals. From 2007 until 2017, I spent pretty much every day of my working life inside a Revit model. I loved it, and I knew my way around even the dirtiest, darkest corners of it. Often, it is the basics that are overlooked and cause far more significant problems than one could imagine.  2020-10-01
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